Coinbase

Redundancy Spreadsheets: Coinbase and Robinhood use Coda

Redundancy Spreadsheets: Coinbase and Robinhood use Coda

Welcome back to our Workplace newsletter where we cover how technology is shaping the workplace. What is it the most stressful thing about your working day? Send me an email and we might include it in an upcoming newsletter.

Today: Coda created an easy way for laid-off workers to find new opportunities, why developers are the best workers to help you choose cybersecurity tools, and a new survey shows that some workers really hate going back to the office.

A template for finding your next employee or your next job

After a layoff, the easiest way to bring new job seekers and desperate recruits together is with a spreadsheet. A generous soul will often step in and create a Google Sheet for laid-off employees to add their names to, sparing recruiters endless #opentowork LinkedIn scrolling. But maybe there is a better way.

Companies like Coinbase and Robinhood now have “alumni websites” on doc app Coda to help people find other opportunities after sweeping layoffs.

  • Kenny Mendes — head of finance, people and operations at Coda — said that sometimes these sites are created organically by those who are laid off or remaining workers. In other cases, as in the case of Coinbase, websites are created by the company itself to help laid-off employees get back on their feet.
  • Google Sheets is still the clear favorite for quickly making lists and sharing them. Its dominance is evident on Layoffs.fyi, which compiles lists of laid-off companies and employees. Coda was used twice and Airtable once.
  • But Mendes believes that crowdsourcing the termination list in Coda dramatically improves the experience for all parties. “You can go through it in a really organized way,” he said.

Spreadsheets can quickly become chaotic when thousands of people have editing access. Mendes said he noticed a rise in rosters during the wave of layoffs in 2020, but it was difficult for recruiters to sort through them.

  • “It would crash, it wouldn’t load, someone would come and sort it again,” Mendes said. “As a result, I knew hiring managers and recruiters weren’t touching it. They would rummage around, but they wouldn’t reach out.”
  • Mendes decided to create a talent roster template at Coda and reached out to Jonathan Liebtag when Airbnb announced layoffs in 2020. Together, they published an “AirAlumni” list and organized people by specialty and location.
  • He did the same when Uber had layoffs and ended up hiring SiNing Chan, an ex-Uber roster content designer who is now a solutions architect at Coda.

Earlier this year, Chan created an updated job listing template at Coda. “I created this document as a way to pay it forward after benefiting from a similar list I came across when I was unexpectedly laid off in 2020,” the description reads.

  • Coinbase found and used the template itself, but Chan helped Robinhood and Better.com launch their lists. The former Better.com employee was overwhelmed trying to manage the list on her own, so Chan stepped in to help.
  • “It’s so cool when tools can be used for good and to help people,” Chan said. Knowledge sharing tools, while built for practical use in the workplace, are often used to connect people with needed resources.

Layoffs and the resulting job search are “soul-sucking,” as Chan put it. She was unexpectedly fired twice. Adding your name to a more convenient spreadsheet tool doesn’t make getting fired any less painful. But Chan hopes that when people are ready to jump at the next opportunity, they will find Coda’s template useful. “I just tell people to hang on and give them some tools to help them keep going,” she said.

— Lizzy Lawrence, journalist (electronic mail | twitter)

Trust your developers

For many businesses, embracing developer tools to improve code security is something most leaders welcome. With critical threats such as software supply chain attacks and the rampant exploitation of software bugs, there is a growing urgency to improve the security of open source and proprietary code.

But the bottom-up approach makes sense from a developer’s point of view as well. In many organizations, “developers are frustrated that application security is being pushed on them,” said Janet Worthington, senior analyst at Forrester.

Having a free self-service option for a code security tool is ideal because developers like to experiment with different tools and choose the ones that meet their needs, Worthington told Protocol.

Developers “don’t want to talk to a sales rep,” she said. “They just want to be able to try.”

Read the full story.

SPONSORED CONTENT FROM SOUL MACHINES

They created Digital People. Now celebrities have made themselves available as digital twins: Soul Machines co-founder and CEO Greg Cross and co-founder Mark Sagar, PhD, FRSNZ lead their teams based in Auckland and San Francisco to create digital humans with AI™️ to populate the internet at first, and soon the metaverse.

Read more from Soul Machines

Workers still hate coming to the office

Working full-time in an office is less popular than ever, according to a new survey from research arm Slack’s Future Forum. Just 20% of knowledge professionals told the Future Forum they want to work in an office full-time — fewer than at any time in the last two years.

  • Most workers want to spend more than half the week working remotely, and 55% say they want to work less than three days a week in the office.
  • One in three respondents said they currently work full-time in an office. These workers reported “significantly worse” employee experience scores than remote or hybrid workers, the Future Forum found.
  • 70% of workers who do not like their employer’s flexible working policy said they would be willing to change jobs in the next year.

— Allison Levitsky, reporter (electronic mail | twitter)

SPONSORED CONTENT FROM SOUL MACHINES

They created Digital People. Now they’ve made celebrities available as digital twins: Soul Machines is at the cutting edge of AGI research with its unique digital brain, based on the latest research in neuroscience and developmental psychology.

Read more from Soul Machines

Thoughts, questions, advice? Send them to workplace@protocol.com.

.

Leave a Comment